Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis Projects

hip and knee osteoarthritis

Evaluation and standardization of the hip examination in osteoarthritis

Early hip OA MRI pilot study

Special Cartilage MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) Sub-study for Soccer Youth with Knee Injuries

Knee pain location and findings on x-ray and MRI in knee osteoarthritis: is there a connection?

 

 

Knee pain location and findings on x-ray and MRI in knee osteoarthritis: is there a connection?

 

Synopsis:

Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is the main reason for reduced quality of life in OA patients. Although x-rays and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be helpful for doctors to assess the development of OA, it is unclear how knee pain relates to the findings from these tests. The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of the relationship between pain and information about knee OA as seen in x-rays and MRI. The results from this study may lead to research into early diagnosis and treatment options for people who are of higher risk of developing OA.

Introduction and Background:

OA is the most common form of arthritis in the world. As well, pain in the joints is a major concern for OA patients. However, joint pain is not reported by everyone and the amount of pain that is felt can vary between people. Pain diagrams as reported by patients are a useful and inexpensive way for doctors to give a quick estimate of pain location without the use of x-rays and MRI, which can be costly. Currently x-rays are used by doctors to estimate the severity of OA in the knee joint. However, the connection between characteristics of OA in x-rays and pain as reported by patients is still not clear. MRI is a method of imaging that uses computerized images of the knee joint. It is a more detailed method of looking at the knee joint because it can detect features of arthritis, such as cartilage changes, which cannot be observed through x-rays. Despite this, there is little research on the connection between knee pain location with x-ray and MRI information in patients with OA.

 

The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of the relationship between pain and information about knee OA as seen in x-rays and MRI.

 

Participant Recruitment:

Participants are aged 40-79 years with knee pain and recruited from the Development of a Model for the MRI Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis Study (Phase 2 of the Knee Pain Study).

 

Methodology:

This study will look at whether questions about pain location can be filled out correctly by the study participants and whether it can be filled out correctly on an ongoing basis. This information will be obtained by a questionnaire and will be completed during the regular visit to the Arthritis Research Centre for Phase 2 of the Knee Pain Study. MRI and x-ray scans of the knee will also be taken within one month of this visit. Two months after their visit, participants will be mailed a questionnaire to be filled out again. Information about the knee pain location will be compared to findings on x-ray and MRI.

 

Time Frame:
May 2007 to September 2008.

 

Results:
This project is in the development phase. Results are expected in 2008.

 

Relevance to People Living with Arthritis:

This study will allow us to have a better understanding of the nature of OA pain and its relationship to MRI and x-ray. The results from the questionnaire will allow us to link the location of joint pain of OA patients with findings from x-rays and MRI. This will give doctors a simple and inexpensive way of assessing patients with early knee OA. Findings from this study may also lead to an earlier diagnosis of knee OA and investigations for treatment strategies can be done in people who are at high risk of developing OA.

 

Consumer Involvement:

Consumers will be involved only as participants in this study.

 

Funding Agency:

This study is funded by the OA NET grant, which is funded by the CIHR and the Canadian Arthritis Network.

Publications:
The results from this study will be written up as part of a Master's thesis, presented at arthritis research meetings, and will be published in medical journals.

Project Team Members and Contact Person:

Principal Investigator:

Winnie Tam, Master's Candidate

Experimental Medicine, UBC

Arthritis Research Centre of Canada

Other Investigators:

Jolanda Cibere, MD, PhD

Research Scientist, Arthritis Research Centre of Canada

 

Keywords

pain, knee, osteoarthritis, MRI, x-ray

   
 
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